There were a few things from this book that really stood out to me.

I really liked how he said that every detail is important because the end result is the sum of the details. That is true not only in design, but in everything in life. (Of course) I thought of softball immediately. My coach always says that sure, you can make one error, but if everyone on the field makes 1 error, we end up with 9 errors and we likely lose the game. The little things matter.

I also like that he said designers have three levels of responsibility: to ourselves, to our clients, and to the public at large. In this class I guess we only really have 2, ourselves and the public–but I guess you could make a case that the professors are the clients.

I also like that he kind of boiled what design should be down to three things: clear, simple, and enduring.  That makes sense because you don’t want something that in two years people are going to be like what is that or your logo will have to be redesigned.

“The repercussion of ugliness is endless” this made me laugh out loud (after I got over the fact that it doesn’t read right to me). He was talking about Americans and our use of 8.5×11 paper while the rest of the world uses aesthetically pleasing paper. Is paper realllly that big of a deal? You can always cut it if you don’t like the dimensions. I guess that is just coming from a silly American who is used to her 8.5×11 paper.

I also like that he talks about using white space and how it is just as important as the words. I agree because sometimes people try to cram too much stuff into a little space and I get overwhelmed. Honestly, I do that when I’m taking notes but that’s because it doesn’t need to be aesthetically pleasing to me.

Some things I didn’t like about the book: how random words like “design” were always capitalized. I’m sorry  but the last time I checked design was not a proper noun. He is also very serious about his design. I realize that it is his livelihood and he is probably very good at what he does but he seems (to me) to exaggerate a lot.